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A distributed modelling approach to assess the use of Blue and Green Infrastructures to fulfil stormwater management requirements

Source: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.02.001
Citation: Versini, P.-A., Kotelnikova, N., Poulhes, A., Tchiguirinskaia, I., Schertzer, D., Leurent, F., 2018. A distributed modelling approach to assess the use of Blue and Green Infrastructures to fulfil stormwater management requirements. Landsc. Urban Plan. 173, 60–63. doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2018.02.001
Versini P.-A., Kotelnikova N., Poulhes A., Tchiguirinskaia I., Schertzer D., Leurent F., Landscape and Urban Planning, 2018
Blue and Green Infrastructures (B&GI) are nature-based solutions considered as particularly efficient to reduce the potential impact of new and existing developments with respect to stormwater issues. In order to assess their performance at some large scales compatible with urban projects, adapted distributed rainfall-runoff models are required. The latest advancements of the Multi-Hydro platform have made possible the representation of such B&GI. Applied in a virtual new urban development project located in the Paris region, Multi-Hydro has been used to simulate the impact of B&GI implementation, and their ability to fulfil regulation rules authorizing the connexion to the sewer network. The results show that a combination of several B&GI, if they are widely implemented, could represent an efficient tool to meet regulations at the parcel scale, as they can reduce runoff volume about 90%. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

A framework for assessing and implementing the co-benefits of nature-based solutions in urban areas

Source: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2017.07.008
Citation: Raymond, C.M., Frantzeskaki, N., Kabisch, N., Berry, P., Breil, M., Nita, M.R., Geneletti, D., Calfapietra, C., 2017. A framework for assessing and implementing the co-benefits of nature-based solutions in urban areas. Environ. Sci. Policy 77, 15–24. doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2017.07.008
Raymond C.M., Frantzeskaki N., Kabisch N., Berry P., Breil M., Nita M.R., Geneletti D., Calfapietra C., Environmental Science and Policy, 2017
To address challenges associated with climate resilience, health and well-being in urban areas, current policy platforms are shifting their focus from ecosystem-based to nature-based solutions (NBS), broadly defined as solutions to societal challenges that are inspired and supported by nature. NBS result in the provision of co-benefits, such as the improvement of place attractiveness, of health and quality of life, and creation of green jobs. Few frameworks exist for acknowledging and assessing the value of such co-benefits of NBS and to guide cross-sectoral project and policy design and implementation. In this paper, we firstly developed a holistic framework for assessing co-benefits (and costs) of NBS across elements of socio-cultural and socio-economic systems, biodiversity, ecosystems and climate. The framework was guided by a review of over 1700 documents from science and practice within and across 10 societal challenges relevant to cities globally. We found that NBS can have environmental, social and economic co-benefits and/or costs both within and across these 10 societal challenges. On that base, we develop and propose a seven-stage process for situating co-benefit assessment within policy and project implementation. The seven stages include: 1) identify problem or opportunity; 2) select and assess NBS and related actions; 3) design NBS implementation processes; 4) implement NBS; 5) frequently engage stakeholders and communicate co-benefits; 6) transfer and upscale NBS; and 7) monitor and evaluate co-benefits across all stages. We conclude that the developed framework together with the seven-stage co-benefit assessment process represent a valuable tool for guiding thinking and identifying the multiple values of NBS implementation. © 2017 The Authors

A guide to using nature-based solutions

Think Nature: A guide to using nature-based solutions


Video Source:

IUCN - CEC, International Union for Conservation of Nature - Commission on Education and Communication (url)

Together with CEC's strategic input, IUCN's Eastern and Southern Africa's Regional Programme published this educational documentary to show how communities living around the Mt Elgon in Kenya and Uganda use natural solutions, which are always available, to help tackle environmental challenges efficiently.

A modelling framework for evaluation of the hydrological impacts of nature-based approaches to flood risk management, with application to in-channel interventions across a 29-km2 scale catchment in the United Kingdom

Source: https://doi.org/10.1002/hyp.11140
Citation: Metcalfe, P., Beven, K., Hankin, B., Lamb, R., 2017. A modelling framework for evaluation of the hydrological impacts of nature-based approaches to flood risk management, with application to in-channel interventions across a 29-km2 scale catchment in the United Kingdom. Hydrol. Process. 31, 1734–1748. doi:10.1002/hyp.11140
Metcalfe P., Beven K., Hankin B., Lamb R., Hydrological Processes, 2017
Nature-based approaches to flood risk management are increasing in popularity. Evidence for the effectiveness at the catchment scale of such spatially distributed upstream measures is inconclusive. However, it also remains an open question whether, under certain conditions, the individual impacts of a collection of flood mitigation interventions could combine to produce a detrimental effect on runoff response. A modelling framework is presented for evaluation of the impacts of hillslope and in-channel natural flood management interventions. It couples an existing semidistributed hydrological model with a new, spatially explicit, hydraulic channel network routing model. The model is applied to assess a potential flood mitigation scheme in an agricultural catchment in North Yorkshire, United Kingdom, comprising various configurations of a single variety of in-channel feature. The hydrological model is used to generate subsurface and surface fluxes for a flood event in 2012. The network routing model is then applied to evaluate the response to the addition of up to 59 features. Additional channel and floodplain storage of approximately 70,000 m3 is seen with a reduction of around 11% in peak discharge. Although this might be sufficient to reduce flooding in moderate events, it is inadequate to prevent flooding in the double-peaked storm of the magnitude that caused damage within the catchment in 2012. Some strategies using features specific to this catchment are suggested in order to improve the attenuation that could be achieved by applying a nature-based approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

A new marine measure enhancing Zostera marina seed germination and seedling survival

Source: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2017.04.004
Citation: Sousa, A.I., Valdemarsen, T., Lillebø, A.I., Jørgensen, L., Flindt, M.R., 2017. A new marine measure enhancing Zostera marina seed germination and seedling survival. Ecol. Eng. 104, 131–140. doi:10.1016/j.ecoleng.2017.04.004
Sousa A.I., Valdemarsen T., Lillebø A.I., Jørgensen L., Flindt M.R., Ecological Engineering, 2017
Seagrass global distribution has declined in the last decades due to many causes, and the implementation of recovery programmes as well as the development of new restoration techniques are needed. This work describes the development of an innovative restoration measure to enhance Zostera marina (eelgrass) seed germination and seedling survival in sediments inhabited by lugworms (Arenicola marina) and its validation in mesocosm experiments. The technique consists of placing 3 cm thick biodegradable coconut fibre mats (membrane) in the surface sediment to exclude the negative effects of sediment reworking (burial of seeds and destabilization/burial of seedlings). Two different flume mesocosm experiments were setup to test for: i) the effect of membranes on burial of Z. marina seeds; ii) the effect of membranes on survival and growth of Z. marina seedlings. The experiments were run for 8 and 10 weeks, respectively. Results show that the membrane was effectively preventing critical burial of Z. marina seeds as all seed mimics placed on the surface initially were recovered from 0 to 4 cm depth in the plots with membrane, while in the absence of the membrane, all seeds were buried to below the critical depth of 5–6 cm. The membrane also significantly enhanced the survival of Z. marina seedlings. The initial seedling density was in both cases 30/m2 and the final density was 26.0 ± 3.3/m2 with membrane versus 8.0 ± 1.6/m2 without membrane. This new marine restoration measure showed to be effective on the reduction of the physical stress imposed by sediment reworking lugworms on Z. marina recovery, as a membrane keeps seeds at optimal depth for germination and protects seedlings from burial and erosion. In comparison to other measures, this new restoration technique is a low-tech nature-based solution. The results clearly show that this restoration technique can support Z. marina recovery through seeds and seedling protection. In this way, this technique contributes to decrease Z. marina vulnerability and increase its natural recovery potential and stability. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

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