Article


A Framework for Assessing Benefits of Implemented Nature-Based Solutions

Submitted by Maria Lilli on December 12, 2019 - 10:34am

Nature-based solutions (NBS) are solutions that can protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified ecosystems in urban and rural areas, while providing many benefits and co-benefits including stormwater mitigation, biodiversity enhancement, and human well-being. As such, NBS have the potential to alleviate many of the environmental, social, and economic issues that we face today.

Think Nature-based Solutions

Submitted by Maria Lilli on December 11, 2019 - 10:13am

This article was published at the Project Repository Journal (Oct/ Nov 2019 – Volume 3, pages 56-59) [link]. The article summarizes all the achievements of the ThinkNature project with links on the exploitable results and the deliverables that can be found on the ThinkNature Platform.

An assessment framework for climate-proof nature-based solutions

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on May 17, 2019 - 10:09am

Raising interest in ‘nature-based solutions’ (NBS) has inspired attempts to organise their principles and qualities within comprehensive and internally consistent evaluation frameworks, so as to demonstrate the superior performance of ‘working with nature’. However, the proposed frameworks stop short of taking into account the changing conditions in which NBS are set to operate. Climate change, in particular, can alter ecosystems and their services, and may undermine the performance of green solutions that rely on them.

Volunteered information on nature-based solutions — Dredging for data on deculverting

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on April 19, 2019 - 10:41am

Much has been written about the potential contribution of citizen-science approaches to further urban environmental sustainability, and associated interventions such as nature-based solutions (NBS). Engagements between researchers and stakeholders relying on bottom-up information provision, for instance community mapping, are often purported to play a vital role in developing shared knowledge, achieving greater impact and stimulating innovation. However, relatively few studies within the realm of NBS have reported on experiences in using volunteered information, or their results.

TOWARDS ELECTIONS

Katerina Lilli's picture
Submitted by Katerina Lilli on February 4, 2019 - 11:31am

The EU has heavily invested in projects to renature cities.
After the European elections, a new executive will head the EU. What will happen to the NBS policy?

Consultation on IUCN Global Standard for Nature-based Solutions

Katerina Lilli's picture
Submitted by Katerina Lilli on February 4, 2019 - 11:23am

A public consultation on IUCN’s Global Standard for Nature-based Solutions is now open.

This standard aims to create a common understanding and consensus on what constitutes a good nature-based solutions. It is intended to be a simple yet robust hands-on tool that informs the planning, design and implementation of nature-based solutions, especially as an alternative to other types of development interventions such as hard infrastructure. In doing so, the standard will support wider uptake of the nature-based solutions concept.

EKLIPSE Call for Experts

Katerina Lilli's picture
Submitted by Katerina Lilli on February 4, 2019 - 11:16am

EKLIPSE is inviting experts to join an expert working group to support the negotiators from the EU and its Member States to provide relevant comment on the IPBES Global assessment Summary for Policy-Makers (SPM).

In May 2019, the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) will hold its 7th Plenary Session. During this meeting, representatives of 130 Governments will be presented, for discussion and possible approval, with a definitive new global synthesis of the state of nature, ecosystems and nature’s contributions to people.

Species-specific synergistic effects of two plant growth—promoting microbes on green roof plant biomass and photosynthetic efficiency

Submitted by Marja Mesimäki on January 9, 2019 - 1:38pm

Rhizophagus irregularis, an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, a bacterium, are microorganisms that promote plant growth. They associate with plant roots and facilitate nutrient absorption by their hosts, increase resistance against pathogens and pests, and regulate plant growth through phytohormones. In this study, eight local plant species in Finland (Antennaria dioica, Campanula rotundifolia, Fragaria vesca, Geranium sanguineum, Lotus corniculatus, Thymus serpyllum, Trifolium repens, and Viola tricolor) were inoculated with R. irregularis and/or B.

Neo-spaces for urban livability? Urbanites' versatile mental images of green roofs in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland

Submitted by Marja Mesimäki on December 10, 2018 - 4:11pm

Within the context of enhancing sustainable and livable urban environments, one aim is to establish multifunctional green infrastructure (GI). We argue that in order to successfully plan and manage the development of GI, an inclusive and future-oriented stance concerning the needs and expectations of urbanites is required. By using green roofs as an example, the aim of this paper was to offer insights into how people envisage novel GI in urban environments and to reveal the scope of meanings and values people attach to these kinds of green infrastructure.

Do small green roofs have the possibility to offer recreational and experiential benefits in a dense urban area? A case study in Helsinki, Finland.

Submitted by Marja Mesimäki on December 10, 2018 - 3:55pm

Growing and densifying cities set challenges for preserving and enhancing sufficient and good quality green urban environment. Rooftops offer vacant room for additional urban greening that may contribute to the well-being of people and the liveability of cities, but this potential lacks empirical support. In spite of the fact that even small green spaces produce, for example restorative experiences, the literature concerning the experiential and recreational benefits of green roofs is still scarce.