Watershed Management & Ecosystem Restoration


Multifunctional nature-based watershed management & ecosystem restoration

Nature-Based Solutions in the EU: Innovating with nature to address social, economic and environmental challenges

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 10:44am
Contemporary societies are facing a broad range of challenges, from pressures on human health and well-being to natural capital depletion, and the security of food, water and energy. These challenges are deeply intertwined with global processes, such as climate change and with local events such as natural disasters. The EU's research & innovation (R&I) policy is now seeking to address these challenges from a new perspective, with Nature-Based Solutions, and turn them into innovation opportunities that optimise the synergies between nature, society and the economy.

Production of moss-dominated biocrusts to enhance the stability and function of the margins of artificial water bodies

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 10:37am
Margins of water reservoirs associated with dams can have high-frequency tides, promoting soil erosion and nutrient leaching. We propose the use of biocrusts for restoration and ecological engineering purposes, due to their poikilohydric character, to stabilize reservoir margins. We promoted biocrust growth under controlled conditions, testing two types of substrate: native sand and organic substrate. After 2 months, biocrusts grew on organic substrate covering almost all the area, but not on native sand.

Integrated modelling of stormwater treatment systems uptake

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 9:44am
Nature-based solutions provide a variety of benefits in growing cities, ranging from stormwater treatment to amenity provision such as aesthetics. However, the decision-making process involved in the installation of such green infrastructure is not straightforward, as much uncertainty around the location, size, costs and benefits impedes systematic decision-making. We developed a model to simulate decision rules used by local municipalities to install nature-based stormwater treatment systems, namely constructed wetlands, ponds/basins and raingardens.

From End-of-Pipe to Nature Based Solutions: a Simple Statistical Tool for Maximizing the Ecosystem Services Provided by Reservoirs for Drinking Water Treatment

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 9:38am
Despite the efforts to control, protect and improve freshwater resources, eutrophication is still one of the main causes for reservoir water quality deterioration. Low-quality raw water reaching water supply treatment plants (WTP) implies an increment of chemical reagents to meet safety requirements, which may also increase the potential of disinfection by-products formation.

Five decades of soil erosion research in “terroir”. The State-of-the-Art

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:46pm
Although soil erosion in vineyards is key to understanding the sustainability of agricultural management, there is not a worldwide definitive state-of-the-art review. It is accepted that soil erosion in vineyards has been more a scientific issue than an agronomic and environmental concern, and this review will point out key issues that will allow the designing of new and advanced research projects.

Marine reserves can mitigate and promote adaptation to climate change

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:43pm
Strong decreases in greenhouse gas emissions are required to meet the reduction trajectory resolved within the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, even these decreases will not avert serious stress and damage to life on Earth, and additional steps are needed to boost the resilience of ecosystems, safeguard their wildlife, and protect their capacity to supply vital goods and services.

Overcoming water challenges through nature-based solutions

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:39pm
Freshwater is a key resource and medium for various economic sectors and domestic purposes but its use is often at the expense of natural ecosystems. Water management must change to deal with urgent issues and protect aquatic ecosystems and their services, while addressing the demand for water from the competing claims for cities, agriculture, industry, energy and transport. In this paper key water challenges (shortage, pollution, aquatic ecosystems threatened) have been identified via global modelling.

How could companies engage in sustainable landscape management? An exploratory perspective

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:39pm
Current concepts that aim to align economic development with sustainability, such as the circular and green economy, often consider natural systems as externalities. We extend the green economy concept by including the landscape as the provider of social, economic and environmental values. Our aim is to explore how companies could engage in creating landscape-inclusive solutions for sustainable landscapes. We propose a conceptual model of the relationship between companies and landscape services based on a demand for landscape benefits by companies, implications for wider society.

Drivers and trajectories of land cover change in East Africa: Human and environmental interactions from 6000 years ago to present

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:36pm
East African landscapes today are the result of the cumulative effects of climate and land-use change over millennial timescales. In this review, we compile archaeological and palaeoenvironmental data from East Africa to document land-cover change, and environmental, subsistence and land-use transitions, over the past 6000 years. Throughout East Africa there have been a series of relatively rapid and high-magnitude environmental shifts characterised by changing hydrological budgets during the mid- to late Holocene.

Betting against Human Ingenuity: The Perils of the Economic Valuation of Nature's Services

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:33pm
At the turn of the twentieth century, economic ornithologists focused on the monetary value of services provided by birds in order to fit nature conservation into the dominant economic paradigm. Pest control was of key interest because of its political importance and because it was relatively easy to quantify and monetize. However, this particular service became obsolete when a human-made solution was introduced that performed the same service - seemingly more cost effectively and reliably - undermining the political standing of economic ornithology.