Well-being in Urban Areas


NbS for improving Well-being in Urban Areas

Urban forest research in the Mediterranean: A systematic review

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:29pm
The Mediterranean region is facing many challenges, some of which can be addressed by nature-based solutions such as urban forests and green space. However, at best, urban forest research from Mediterranean countries has been only briefly addressed in review papers up to date. This Scopus-based review paper provides first insights into the development of urban forest research in the Mediterranean in the 20-year period from 1996 to 2015.

Nature-based solutions: New influence for environmental management and research in Europe

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:19pm
Greening roofs or walls to cool down city areas during summer, to capture storm water, to abate pollution, and to increase human well-being while enhancing biodiversity: nature-based solutions (NBS) refer to the sustainable management and use of nature for tackling societal challenges. Building on and complementing traditional biodiversity conservation and management strategies, NBS integrate science, policy, and practice and create biodiversity benefits in terms of diverse, well-managed ecosystems.

Healthy people with nature in mind

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 6:12pm
Background: The global disease burden resulting from climate change is likely to be substantial and will put further strain on public health systems that are already struggling to cope with demand. An up- stream solution, that of preventing climate change and associated adverse health effects, is a promising approach, which would create win-win-situations where both the environment and human health benefit. One such solution would be to apply methods of behaviour change to prompt pro-environmentalism, which in turn benefits health and wellbeing.

A spatial framework for targeting urban planning for pollinators and people with local stakeholders: A route to healthy, blossoming communities?

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 19, 2018 - 5:56pm
Pollinators such as bees and hoverflies are essential components of an urban ecosystem, supporting and contributing to the biodiversity, functioning, resilience and visual amenity of green infrastructure. Their urban habitats also deliver health and well-being benefits to society, by providing important opportunities for accessing nature nearby to the homes of a growing majority of people living in towns and cities. However, many pollinator species are in decline, and the loss, degradation and fragmentation of natural habitats are some of the key drivers of this change.

URBANFLUXES: Heat produced in our cities is affecting human mortality

Cities are much warmer than their surroundings. Urban structures absorb and trap more solar and thermal radiation than soils or vegetation and that causes an increase in the urban temperature. Moreover, many human activities add heat to the urban climate. The heating and the cooling of buildings, the traffic, various industrial activities and our own human metabolism release energy in the form of heat, called anthropogenic heat.

ThinkNature Project on Nature-based Solutions

The ThinkNature project animation explains what Nature-based Solutions (NBS) are and how the ThinkNature Project and Platform aim to use this NBS as a better instrument to overcome development challenges and needs. Nature-based Solutions are an important topic on the EU Research and Innovation policy agenda. The ThinkNature project is part of Horizon 2020, the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation and has received funding under grant agreement No 730338.