Well-being in Urban Areas


NbS for improving Well-being in Urban Areas

Case 11: Urban green infrastructure in Vienna - Nature-based solutions to enhancing quality of life

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on June 22, 2018 - 5:49pm
The world is urbanising. Since 2005 more than half of the world population lives in cities, and by 2050 this figure is projected to be two-thirds of all people. Seventy-five per cent of Europeans already live in urban areas. City landscapes generally experience higher temperatures than the less built up areas around them, due to the absorption and retention of heat by roads and buildings and the disruption of airflow by structures, with differences of temperatures ranging from 4°C up to 10°C.

Including Nature in Engineering Decisions for Sustainability

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on June 22, 2018 - 5:47pm
This article describes methods and concepts for emulating and including nature's role in engineering activities, with the expectation that they will contribute to sustainable engineering. Existing nature-inspired methods function at different levels ranging from individual products to large integrated networks.

Urban green space in the transition to the eco-city: Policies, multifunctionality and narrative

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on June 22, 2018 - 5:46pm
Urban green space provides multiple benefits to city dwellers- both human and non-human. These 'nature-based solutions' include mitigating urban heat and stormwater runoff, providing biodiversity habitat and contributing to human health and wellbeing, and social and cultural processes, which are key elements in creating ecological cities. In the transition to eco-cities, public policies for urban green space provision can make substantial contributions.

Ecosystem services reference book

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 2:04pm
This reference book is made up of currently 26 individual Synthesis Papers (SPs) generated by the OpenNESS members. The individual SPs have been formally consulted within the entire OpenNESS consortium and hence represent an agreed document for OpenNESS defining and elaborating on essential ideas linked to the ecosystem service concept. All SPs have been gone through an editorial process including approved revisions. The consultation was handled for the consortium in a transparent way, e.g., the consortium could see how authors responded to the comments/criticism on the original drafts.

Nature-based solutions for local climate adaptation in the Basque Country

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 2:02pm
Natural Solutions, in the context of this Guide, refer to those urban interventions from a broad perspective, use nature - and its processes - to mitigate the impacts arising from climate change and foster the adaptation of the municipality and the general public to the changes. These Natural Solutions include both micro-scale interventions in buildings, such as green roofs and facades, and also other natural elements, blue and green infrastructures in the public spaces, connected to the parks and natural areas of the municipalities.

Stakeholder Engagement Handbook

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 2:01pm
The BiodivERsA Stakeholder Engagement Handbook is a non-academic practical guide for researchers planning and carrying out research projects. It is designed to assist research teams identify relevant stakeholders to engage with in order to enhance the impact of their work. The Handbook draws upon exiting literature and presents case studies that provide clear, simple guidance, which considers ‘why’, ‘who’, ‘when’ and ‘how’ to engage.

Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change Adaptation in Urban Areas

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 1:59pm
This book brings together research findings and experiences from science, policy and practice to highlight and debate the importance of nature-based solutions to climate change adaptation in urban areas. Emphasis is given to the potential of nature-based approaches to create multiple-benefits for society. The expert contributions present recommendations for creating synergies between ongoing policy processes, scientific programmes and practical implementation of climate change and nature conservation measures in global urban areas.

Innovating with Nature: Infographic

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 1:58pm
We are facing a broad range of challenges, such as unsustainable urbanization and related human health issues, degradation and loss of natural capital and the ecosystem services it provides (clean air, water and soil), climate change and an alarming increase of natural disaster risks. Currently over 70% of Europe's population live in cities, expected to increase to over 80% by the middle of the century. This translates to 36 million new urban citizens, who will need housing, employment and care by 2050.

Public Health and Landscape

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 1:56pm
The state of our health services is rarely out of the news. Understandably, there is a huge concern about acute provision and the treatment of ill health. Much has been written about the increased incidence of obesity, the persistence of health inequalities and the best ways to care for an ageing population. We believe that much greater priority needs to be given to prevention of ill health in public health and social care. In April 2013, responsibility for public health moved from the NHS in England to local authorities.

Economic Benefits of Accessible Green Spaces for Physical and Mental Health: Scoping study

Submitted by Stavros Stagakis on June 20, 2018 - 1:55pm
There is a growing concern in government with the health status of the population and its increasing sedentary lifestyle. 23% of males and 26% of females in the UK are classified as sedentary. The cost of physical inactivity in England is estimated at £8.2bn per year with an additional £2.5bn as the contribution of inactivity to obesity. The Public Health White Paper (Department of Health, 2004a) has, as three of its six overarching priorities, ‘reducing obesity’, ‘increasing exercise’ and ‘improving mental health’. Greenspace can contribute to the delivery of these objectives.