Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation


This domain will initiate and sustain dialogue among the various stakeholders (private and public sector, architects, practitioners, policy maker), on nature-based solutions in the context of climate change adaptation and mitigation. The dialogue will address integrated and holistic solutions that meet both adaptation and mitigation objectives and are applicable across different sectors such as integrating materials, green and blue infrastructure, and enhancing ecosystems. Natural resources management and cost-effectiveness enhancement of NBS in order to address societal and environmental challenges such as developing low cost, low maintenance and low carbon emissions solutions to climate change challenges. Integration of new and innovative approaches and Methods for robust monitoring of the performance and assessment of the impact of deployed NBS will be examined.

Damming deltas: A practice of the past? Towards nature-based flood defense

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:06pm
There is extensive experience in adaptive management of exposed sandy coastlines through sand nourishment for coastal protection. However, in complex estuarine systems, coastlines are often shortened through damming estuaries to achieve desired safety levels. The Dutch Deltaworks illustrate that this approach disrupts natural sediment fluxes and harms ecosystem health, which negatively affects derived ecosystem services, such as freshwater availability and mussel and oyster farming. This heavily impacts local communities and thus requires additional maintenance and management efforts.

Building land with a rising sea

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:05pm
Coastal lowlands are increasingly exposed to flood risks from sea-level rise and extreme weather events (1). Megacities like Shanghai, London, New York, and Bangkok that lie in vast river deltas are particularly vulnerable. Dramatic flood disasters include the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005, Hurricane Sandy in New York in 2012, and Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013.

Global recognition that ecosystems are key to human resilience in a warming world

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:03pm
Ecosystems are not merely vulnerable to climate change but, if sustainably restored and protected, are a major source of human resilience. Not only is the science evidence-base for this perspective growing rapidly, but ecosystems are featuring with increasing prominence in global climate change policy.

Evidence Brief—How effective are Nature-based Solutions to climate change adaptation?

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:02pm
There is growing recognition that naturebased (or ‘green’) solutions - i.e. the restoration or rehabilitation and protection of natural habitats - when applied strategically and equitably can not only safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services but also help people adapt to climate change [1,2]. The type of NbS targeted at helping people adapt to the impacts and hazards of climate change is widely referred to as “Ecosystem-based Adaptation” (EbA).

Ecosystem Based Adaptation: Knowledge Gaps in Making an Economic Case for Investing in Nature Based Solutions for Climate Change

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:00pm
Changes in global climate are increasingly having adverse impacts on human populations and natural systems. This has resulted in increased efforts to come up with options that can mitigate the impacts, as well as help to adapt to already occurring changes. Ecosystem based adaptation is used by a number of organisations and in many developed and developing countries as a means for climate adaptation, especially at the community level. It is also applied for disaster risk reduction.

Nature-Based Solutions

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:56pm
The idea of ‘nature-based solutions’ (NBS) is now being used to reframe policy debates on biodiversity conservation, climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and the sustainable use of natural resources, among other issues. While interesting and potentially useful for those debates, it is a concept that still needs to be clearly defined; its use is not confined to discussions about ecosystem services and natural capital.

An economic valuation of the recreational benefits associated with nature-based forest management practices

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:51pm
The presented study aimed at identifying and assessing public preferences for variations in tree species composition, tree height structure, and presence of dead trees left for natural decay—forest characteristics which are likely to be affected when subjecting stands to nature-based forest management in the temperate, nemoral deciduous zone. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and by applying choice experiments to elicit people's willingness to pay (WTP).

The science, policy and practice of nature-based solutions: An interdisciplinary perspective

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:50pm
In this paper, we reflect on the implications for science, policy and practice of the recently introduced concept of Nature-Based Solutions (NBS), with a focus on the European context. First, we analyse NBS in relation to similar concepts, and reflect on its relationship to sustainability as an overarching framework. From this, we derive a set of questions to be addressed and propose a general framework for how these might be addressed in NBS projects by funders, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and NatureBased Defences

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:46pm
"There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding worldwide for nature-based defences–i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose.