Restoring Degraded Ecosystems Using NbS


This domain will initiate and sustain dialogue among the various stakeholders (private and public sector, architects, practitioners, policy maker), on nature-based solutions in the context of degraded ecosystems restoration. The dialogue will address the expanding resource needs for land within Europe and how to prioritize agriculture, forestry, energy, transport and industry. The role of combined efforts in this field as well as innovative techniques for restoring and reclaiming land, such as soil fertility restoration techniques. The benefits of restoring ecosystems using green infrastructure and the role of restoration in increasing resilience and adapting to climate change as well as contributing to human wellbeing. Methods for robust monitoring of the performance and assessment of the impact of deployed NBS will be examined.

The Nature-based Solutions framework - ThinkNature Webinar 1

Submitted by Somarakis Giorgos on January 23, 2019 - 12:32pm
This document concerns the first presentation about defining the framework of NBS, presented by Emmanuelle Cohen-Shacham during the first ThinkNature webinar about "NBS: Concept, Practices and Benefits". This webinar invited scientists, business/market actors, policy makers and authorities’/organizations’ representatives to discover the concept, practices and benefits of NBS.

Nature-Based Solutions

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:56pm
The idea of ‘nature-based solutions’ (NBS) is now being used to reframe policy debates on biodiversity conservation, climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and the sustainable use of natural resources, among other issues. While interesting and potentially useful for those debates, it is a concept that still needs to be clearly defined; its use is not confined to discussions about ecosystem services and natural capital.

The science, policy and practice of nature-based solutions: An interdisciplinary perspective

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:50pm
In this paper, we reflect on the implications for science, policy and practice of the recently introduced concept of Nature-Based Solutions (NBS), with a focus on the European context. First, we analyse NBS in relation to similar concepts, and reflect on its relationship to sustainability as an overarching framework. From this, we derive a set of questions to be addressed and propose a general framework for how these might be addressed in NBS projects by funders, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

The Effectiveness, Costs and Coastal Protection Benefits of Natural and NatureBased Defences

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:46pm
"There is great interest in the restoration and conservation of coastal habitats for protection from flooding and erosion. This is evidenced by the growing number of analyses and reviews of the effectiveness of habitats as natural defences and increasing funding worldwide for nature-based defences–i.e. restoration projects aimed at coastal protection; yet, there is no synthetic information on what kinds of projects are effective and cost effective for this purpose.

The URBES project wins the BiodivERsA Prize for Excellence and Impact

The URBES project has been awarded the opportunity to present their work in an animated video as part of the BiodivERsA Prize for Excellence and Impact.

The URBES project demonstrated, for the first time at this scale, the importance and the value of ecosystem services and nature-based solutions provided by urban biodiversity in European cities, enabling the authorities to work with these concepts in their urban planning strategies.

Solutions inspired by nature

Submitted by Maria Lilli on September 12, 2018 - 3:30pm
Nature-based solutions (NBS) aim to help societies to address a variety of environmental, social and economic challenges in sustainable ways. They are actions which are inspired by and supported by nature. Some involve using and enhancing existing natural solutions to challenges, while others are exploring more novel solutions, for example, based on how non-human organisms and communities cope with environmental extremes.