Risk Management and Resilience


This domain will initiate and sustain dialogue among the various stakeholders (private and public sector, architects, practitioners, policy maker), on nature-based solutions in the context of risk management and resilience of NBS. The dialogue will address methods for combining NBS for risk management in various levels such as reduction of pollution, carbon storage, preservation of biodiversity, recreational activities, and economic opportunities. Synergies in reducing multiple risks in regional level and influence of local level risk management on regional and EU level as well as alternatives on how to leverage funds for long term benefits and to ensure massive involvement of politicians and private companies in the implementation and funding of such solutions will be examined. Ecosystem-based solutions as an innovative way for risk management which combines different scales and planning perspectives will be considered.

The Nature-based Solutions framework - ThinkNature Webinar 1

Submitted by Somarakis Giorgos on January 23, 2019 - 12:32pm

This document concerns the first presentation about defining the framework of NBS, presented by Emmanuelle Cohen-Shacham during the first ThinkNature webinar about "NBS: Concept, Practices and Benefits". This webinar invited scientists, business/market actors, policy makers and authorities’/organizations’ representatives to discover the concept, practices and benefits of NBS.

The Business Case for Investing in Soil Health

Submitted by Juraj Jurik on December 24, 2018 - 11:01am

Soil health also forms a key part of our action on climate change. Healthy soils can help us withstand the effects of climate change that we are locked into, whilst avoiding soil and land degradation and increasing soil carbon stores could help us deliver our commitments to reduce emissions and limit global warming to 2 ⁰C.

The purpose of this publication is to:

Building Urban Resilience with Nature - A Practitioner's Guide to Action

Submitted by Eleni Goni on November 30, 2018 - 3:53pm

Recognizing that the value and role of nature was missing from mainstream planning and decision-making processes, Earth Economics and Resilient Melbourne took up the challenge of creating a practitioner resource for all those who are determined to take concrete steps to bridging the gap between the need to value nature, and political and financial will in policy and capital investments.

Damming deltas: A practice of the past? Towards nature-based flood defense

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:06pm

There is extensive experience in adaptive management of exposed sandy coastlines through sand nourishment for coastal protection. However, in complex estuarine systems, coastlines are often shortened through damming estuaries to achieve desired safety levels. The Dutch Deltaworks illustrate that this approach disrupts natural sediment fluxes and harms ecosystem health, which negatively affects derived ecosystem services, such as freshwater availability and mussel and oyster farming. This heavily impacts local communities and thus requires additional maintenance and management efforts.

Building land with a rising sea

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:05pm

Coastal lowlands are increasingly exposed to flood risks from sea-level rise and extreme weather events (1). Megacities like Shanghai, London, New York, and Bangkok that lie in vast river deltas are particularly vulnerable. Dramatic flood disasters include the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005, Hurricane Sandy in New York in 2012, and Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013.

Global recognition that ecosystems are key to human resilience in a warming world

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:03pm

Ecosystems are not merely vulnerable to climate change but, if sustainably restored and protected, are a major source of human resilience. Not only is the science evidence-base for this perspective growing rapidly, but ecosystems are featuring with increasing prominence in global climate change policy.

Evidence Brief—How effective are Nature-based Solutions to climate change adaptation?

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:02pm

There is growing recognition that naturebased (or ‘green’) solutions - i.e. the restoration or rehabilitation and protection of natural habitats - when applied strategically and equitably can not only safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services but also help people adapt to climate change [1,2]. The type of NbS targeted at helping people adapt to the impacts and hazards of climate change is widely referred to as “Ecosystem-based Adaptation” (EbA).

Ecosystem Based Adaptation: Knowledge Gaps in Making an Economic Case for Investing in Nature Based Solutions for Climate Change

David Parastatidis's picture
Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 6:00pm

Changes in global climate are increasingly having adverse impacts on human populations and natural systems. This has resulted in increased efforts to come up with options that can mitigate the impacts, as well as help to adapt to already occurring changes.

Ecosystem-based adaptation: Question-based guidance for assessing effectiveness

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Submitted by David Parastatidis on November 19, 2018 - 5:59pm

This booklet sets out guidance for assessing the effectiveness of an ecosystem-based approach to climate change adaptation. It describes a process, based around asking a detailed set of questions, that can be used by project managers and researchers to shape project design, assess the progress of an ongoing project or draw conclusions about the effectiveness of a project that has ended.